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Open Heart Surgery (Coronary Bypass)

How is a Coronary Bypass treated?

Open heart surgery or a coronary bypass is a surgical procedure to treat coronary heart disease. The heart is an organ that provides a constant supply of oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body. Surgery improves blood flow and oxygen supply to the heart by diverting blood around narrowed or clogged parts of the major arteries.


What happens before a Coronary Bypass?

You will undergo several tests before the procedure, including blood tests, x-rays, electrocardiogram or echocardiogram and coronary angiography. You will then change into a hospital gown and an intravenous of IV line will be put into your arm to receive a general anesthesia.


What happens during a Coronary Bypass?

An incision in the middle of your chest to expose your heart. A healthy blood vessel is removed from the leg to bypass the blocked or damaged portion of your artery. One end of the graft is attached above the blockage and the other end below it.

You may be connected to a cardiopulmonary bypass machine that circulates oxygenated blood through your body while the operation is carried out. 

A healthy blood vessel is removed from the leg to bypass the blocked or damaged portion of your artery. One end of the graft is attached above the blockage and the other end below it. When the procedure is done, the function of the bypass is checked to ensure that it is working. The incision will then be cleaned and stitched up and bandaged. You will be transfered to the intensive care unit (ICU) for monitoring.


What happens after a Coronary Bypass?

You will recover in the intensive care unit (ICU) for a few days and your vital signs will be monitored. You will feel pain in the incision site as well as pain when you cough or breathe deeply.

After your discharge from hospital, you will be advised to refrain from heavy lifting, limit physical activity and to rest well. You will be prescribed pain relief medications as well as antiplatelet medication like aspirin to prevent the formation of blood clots.

Recovery takes up to 4 months and you will likely be recommended to undergo rehabilitation treatment, which is a series of personalized

physical exercies that will facilitate your recovery. Should you feel unwell, experience a fever and chest pain and rapid heart rate, contact your doctor immediately or call our 24-HR Emergency Clinic (65) 6705 2999.


 

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Dr. Bernard Kwok
郭永权医生

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Dr. Julian Tan Ko Beng
陈高明医生

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